When is a Cock Not a Rooster? A writer’s confusion…

Word count first.  I’m at 126,648 on the Beta draft, and have passed the chapter that could be a cliff hanger if I decide to split the book in two.  I wrote an alternative chapter ending suitable for the cliffhanger, saved it, and continued on the  original manuscript.  I had some zero word days during the week, due to the holiday, but I also had one 5,000 plus word day.

I love those.  They make me feel like a grown-up writer, although I end up a bit spacy by the end of the day, unable to come out of Bookland.

Anyway, adults only from here on.

18 and over please.

Don’t keep reading if you are under 18.  I have already ruined my daughter’s childhood, or so she has told me.  Who knew she would react that way to the word ‘McGuppies’?

I mean it…

When is a Cock not a Rooster?  When it’s a penis, of course.  Did that word make you flinch?  I still does for me, sometimes.  I think it’s strange, how words can make you react so viscerally.  Still, it’s better than some of the historical terms.  If you ever need a laugh, look them up and use them in conversation, maybe even the bed room.  Tallywacker is a favorite.  Try whispering it.

Moist.  That gets a lot of people, but I like it.  Moist cake.  Moist kisses.  Equally decedent.  Equally sought.

I’ve always had a problem with the way people use vagina as the word for female genitals.  That is the internal structure.  Shall we just call the penis a ‘shaft’?  The problem is, I’ve never found a word for the female genitals that isn’t used as an insult, or giggle-inducing flowery, and I have LOOKED.   Just don’t get me started on the ridiculously childish V-jay jay.  You are a grown-ass woman, act like it!

Then you have all the words and phrases for the sex act.  So, so many…  Why are we so obsessed?  There are entire dictionaries with timelines, for the more historically minded.  You don’t want to use the wrong slang in your historical romance, do you?  Do You?

Anyway, the writer attempting to write a sex scene has a hard road to follow.  There are only so many words the modern audience will understand, or tolerate, so you go to the Thesaurus, or lift nice words from other writers.

What word gives you a thrill when reading it?  Put it on the list.  Don’t like it?  I have those words, too.  Frankly, I’m only allowing an author the word ‘lave’ once per book before I want to throw the book at their head.  I’ve seen it too many times in the past three years.

So, now you have all the words; medical, flowery, slang, dirty, and everything in-between, but you can only use them so often before they lose meaning or just bore the reader.  Wait, what if there is more than one sex scene?

Depending on the category of words you use, your work is split into different places.  Romance, vanilla, steamy, erotica, hard core, or porn.  There are probably more, but I’m still playing catch-up.

Problem is, nobody will define the categories, or they contradict themselves.  One publisher’s submissions tips I recently read insisted they wanted steamy ménage (specifically, only m/f/m) but ‘no erotica or porn’.  They didn’t want anything that was ‘just sex, outside of a relationship’.  No porn, yeah, but how does that include erotica?  Is there a different meaning to the word ‘erotic’ that I’m missing?

Then there is the question of what would your character actually use, both as spoken words and internal dialogue.  You have to stay true to the story.  Right?  Yeah, I thought so.

Now, you have your reader.  The range from “Urg, they’re kissing, again”, through “Eek, no squishy bits”, to “Meh, too tame.”  Luckily, no one has to admit their guilty secret if they like to read erotica, especially in the age of e-books.  Awkward is the moment you head to the Erotica section of a book store, only to find someone already there.  Doubly awkward if the person is the opposite gender.  “Just passing through…  this clearly marked, hard to get to, right angled corner of the store.”

Hmmm, I seem to have rambled, and we’re not even into the content of a sex scene.  I guess we should pick it up next week.  Keep an eye out for ‘How deep is your love?’ or maybe ‘Just the tip, I promise.’  I haven’t decided.  Enjoy the start to the new year!

 

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2 thoughts on “When is a Cock Not a Rooster? A writer’s confusion…

  1. To answer your question, erotica is graphic sex (for the most part) without much of a plot. Think Fifty Shades. Minimal plot, all graphic BDSM. How much story you have combined with how you write your sex scenes is your call. For me, I don’t really go for erotica, especially when words like cock or pussy is used. I like to focus on the emotions, the sensations, and describe just enough that the reader knows exactly what’s happening. I think the key when writing these is to write them how you as a reader would want to read them.

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