Low-Budget Writing Program: Part 5 Fear is the Mind-Killer

book cover 1 (2)

Anywriter who spends any time thinking about showing their work to another person has likely felt fear.  Unfortunately, that never goes away, according to the professionals who share tips.

I have already given my thoughts and book suggestions for getting the story written, but, obviously, there is more to learn.  There is a deep connection between the fear of writing and good writing.  Honestly, there should be a copy of “The Courage to Write” by Ralph Keyes (Henry Holt and Company, New York 1995) in the starter pack of every writer.  You didn’t get the starter pack?  Neither did I, but I did find the book at my local library.  (And just in time.)

The book is at first a warm hand telling you all is well, and your fears are perfectly normal and–more importantly–useful, then there are a ton of examples of writers finagling their way around their fears to produce words of worth.  (And writers are pretty creative when it comes to finding a comfortable way to write.  Prepare to be shocked and amazed!)  If you find you are lacking the courage to put your work out there, please seek out this book before giving up on yourself.

“Trying to deny, avoid, numb, or eradicate the fear of writing is neither possible nor desirable.  Anxiety is not only an inevitable part of the writing process but a necessary part.  If you’re not scared, you’re not writing.  No message in this book is more important.  A state of anxiety is the writer’s natural habitat.”

Ralph Keyes

While we are on the subject of fear, there is a book that is incredibly useful in detailing the physical manifestations of fear, and when and why you should listen to your body/brain warnings.  “The Gift of Fear” by Gavin de Becker (Originally published by Little, Brown and Company in 1997, now updated and published by the author through Amazon 2010.) is also useful in lots of other ways to writers and other persons just trying to navigate the world in unsafe times, and nearly as important as a reminder for trusting your intuition.  (Intuition is sister to Inspiration.  Ignore either of them at your peril, for sisters do gossip.)

“‘No’ is a word that must never be negotiated, because the person who choses to not hear it is trying to control you.”

Gavin de Becker

 

Here are the other posts in this series (although, they have not been cleaned up, yet):

  1. Butt in Chair
  2. The Monster in My Manuscript
  3. Take over the Literary World!
  4. When the Manuscript Goes Into the Garbage
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5 Things I Have Learned About E-Book Reviews

  1. Authors NEED Your Reviews.  Maybe not famous authors (like J.K. Rowling, she’s doing fairly well), but those writing for a small genre e-press or the independent e-publishers really need reviews.  Really, really need those reviews.  If by some chance someone from their social media circle looks their book up, OR they get browsed while someone is swiping through pages and pages of books of a favorite genre, the number and rating of the reviews can make or break that sale.  Most readers learn to shy away from zero to few reviews, or if the reviews are all low stars.  (I’ve learned the hard way that these rough draft monstrosities–typed by a monkey and formatted on LSD–are often not worth the money they’re printed on.  Get it?  Printed?  Sorry.)
  2. Authors Need Hard Numbers.  The numbers game is always changing, and it’s hard to find hard data, but the word on the street is that currently 25 reviews will put an author on the “you might also like” Amazon list.  Fifty puts them in the running for feature exposure and other benefits. Sixty is the minimum rumored for BookBub, often cited as one of the most helpful platforms.  (Personally, already having sixty reviews sounds fairly successful, but I guess it’s just the start of becoming the next big thing.)
  3. Authors Shall Not Engage Their Reviewers.  Thank them, if you wish, on your blog or somewhere else. Don’t get cozy on the review page, you are setting a dangerous precedent.  I think authors get surprised by that first one star review, and jump to defend their work.  Don’t.  Even if it’s a wildly inaccurate review, or even a personal attack.  It is always the author that comes off as unreasonable, and they are the only one with a real stake in the review process.  Goodreads is starting to get a bad reputation for authors getting trashed by other writers and proto-writers, and that includes deliberate catfishing.  Setting your followers on them is probably a bad idea, also.  Mob mentality is particularly nasty in the online world. (Don’t be the orc that whips the trolls into attacking.)
  4. It’s a Review, Not a Book Report.  Keep it short and to the point.  Most people will not bother to read your ten paragraph critique and summary.  A single paragraph, or even a sentence or two, is plenty.  Everybody has things to do, and you can spend the time reading and reviewing another book.  (I also don’t bother with less than a three star review.  For my reasoning check my blog, “Why I Won’t Give a One Star Review.”)
  5. Five Star Reviews Don’t Promise a Good Book.  Sometimes an author has a fan base that is rabid, despite the book being a drug fueled, simian screech pounded into unreadable prose.  Feel free to poke that hornet’s nest with a one star review, but I prefer to back away slowly.  (It’s a tactical withdrawal.  Really.)

I’m still the newcomer to this madhouse of self-publishing, but I’m beginning to find my footing on the black light lit, mattress strewn, maze of contradictions.  My heartfelt thanks go out to those who are helping us noobs, holding our hands and lighting a penlight in the darkness.