Low-Budget Writing Program: Part 5 Fear is the Mind-Killer

book cover 1 (2)

Anywriter who spends any time thinking about showing their work to another person has likely felt fear.  Unfortunately, that never goes away, according to the professionals who share tips.

I have already given my thoughts and book suggestions for getting the story written, but, obviously, there is more to learn.  There is a deep connection between the fear of writing and good writing.  Honestly, there should be a copy of “The Courage to Write” by Ralph Keyes (Henry Holt and Company, New York 1995) in the starter pack of every writer.  You didn’t get the starter pack?  Neither did I, but I did find the book at my local library.  (And just in time.)

The book is at first a warm hand telling you all is well, and your fears are perfectly normal and–more importantly–useful, then there are a ton of examples of writers finagling their way around their fears to produce words of worth.  (And writers are pretty creative when it comes to finding a comfortable way to write.  Prepare to be shocked and amazed!)  If you find you are lacking the courage to put your work out there, please seek out this book before giving up on yourself.

“Trying to deny, avoid, numb, or eradicate the fear of writing is neither possible nor desirable.  Anxiety is not only an inevitable part of the writing process but a necessary part.  If you’re not scared, you’re not writing.  No message in this book is more important.  A state of anxiety is the writer’s natural habitat.”

Ralph Keyes

While we are on the subject of fear, there is a book that is incredibly useful in detailing the physical manifestations of fear, and when and why you should listen to your body/brain warnings.  “The Gift of Fear” by Gavin de Becker (Originally published by Little, Brown and Company in 1997, now updated and published by the author through Amazon 2010.) is also useful in lots of other ways to writers and other persons just trying to navigate the world in unsafe times, and nearly as important as a reminder for trusting your intuition.  (Intuition is sister to Inspiration.  Ignore either of them at your peril, for sisters do gossip.)

“‘No’ is a word that must never be negotiated, because the person who choses to not hear it is trying to control you.”

Gavin de Becker

 

Here are the other posts in this series (although, they have not been cleaned up, yet):

  1. Butt in Chair
  2. The Monster in My Manuscript
  3. Take over the Literary World!
  4. When the Manuscript Goes Into the Garbage
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Why I Won’t Give A One Star Review

It’s a review, not a critique.

In fact, I don’t give less than a three star review.  Call me crazy if you wish, but a real person is behind that book.  Someone who (hopefully) tried their best.  I am not going to gleefully rip apart their work, just a faceless troll who lives for pain.

I have limited time, and it’s not my job to beta read and critique a published work.  If I liked a book at all, despite any problems, I’ll give it a favorable review and maybe point out something that threw me out of the reading groove.  The rule of thumb I was given while judging works of art was two positive comments for every negative, and it has never steered me wrong.

If it was too deeply flawed, I’ll skip the review.  My silence is my opinion.  My upbringing deeply instilled an ethic of, “If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything, at all.”

The book review is not the place for a deep critique.  Unless the author knows and trusts my opinion, it’s just a jumble of hateful words.  I won’t be that person.  I know how to give constructive criticism, and the review is too late.

If you chastise me for unbalancing a system that tries to rate books according to their merit, to you I say, “So What?”  At what point, in this screwed up system, does true fair play come into effect?  Shall I point out the people who admit to not finishing the book?  How is that fair?  Shall I point to the recent trend of ‘catfishing’?  How is that fair?  The person hurt in those situations is the author; dammed if they fight back, dammed if they don’t.

That being said, If I haven’t reviewed YOUR book (there are a few of you, and you know who you are), I’m not being silent and judgey.  I’m being overwhelmed with learning to blog, tweet, beta read, self-edit, navigate Word, my homemade writing course, make a website, figure out formatting, and one… other… thing.

Oh, yeah.  WRITE.  Apply butt to chair, tear thoughts out of my head, organize into words, lather, rinse, & repeat.

Wait.  Is that right?

Anyway, I’ll get you that review, ASAP.  I promise.  🙂