Low-Budget Writing Program: Part 7 BUY MY BOOK!!!!!

 

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This sweet puppy wants you to buy my book.  How can you say no?

Assuming you are going to publish a book of some type (and it doesn’t matter if it’s self or traditional) you are going to need buyers.  Readers, preferably, but anybody’s money works just as well.  So, where do you find those walking moneybags in a tight economy?  Everywhere and anywhere, you just need to not frighten them away with heavy-handed techniques.

 

Scan_20171129 (6)First of all, you could consider your local arts scene.  Everyplace has one, and the more it gets suppressed by the locals, the more fiercely it burns.  Ariel Gore is a teacher of this promotional method, most easily found in her ‘How To Become A Famous Writer Before You’re Dead’ (Three Rivers Press, New York 2007).  With lots of tips for self promotion and conquering your introverted fears, she divides the concept into bite-sized portions, then presents them as fine cuisine.  Don’t just wait around for a chance to read your work in public; create that event, find a musician, get some puppets!  Give people a memorable show.  Don’t wait for someone to publish you; write a story or poem, draw a picture, make it a ‘zine (small run, independent magazine), sell it to friends and strangers.  Now you’re published!  Add it to your bio!

(Ok, to be honest, all that in-person self promotion stuff terrifies me, but if I have learned anything about life and WRITING, is to go toward the things that frighten you.  It’s the only way to live authentically.  I’ll update y’all in the future on how this goes.)

If, like me, introversion is your north star, you might be better served by the Wide World of Interactive-at-a-Distance Social Media.  We will assume you currently have some kind of presence, since you are reading this blog, but is it the kind of presence that will get you readers?  Will they Buy Your Book when you publish?  Will they flee from your constant begging?

If you dig around on the internet, there are tons of articles and blogs discussing this problem.  I advise you to just absorb all that you can stand, let it stew, then follow your instincts on how and where to spend your energy.  If you are going to continue to write, you have to save enough of your limited energy for that.

There are also a few Amazon e-books that have helped me:

Kristen Lamb’s ‘Rise of the Machines: Human Authors in a Digital World’ (WANA International 2013) is a clear-eyed look to the future of self-publishing and the age of on-line personas.  She also heads a writer’s co-op, and blogs about the challenges a writer faces.  She’s fun to follow on Facebook, too.

Brian Rathbone’s ‘How You Can Sell More Books: Proven Audience Building Strategies’ (White Wolf Press 2015) is from his experience in the fantasy genre, but could be applies easily to other genres as well.  He’s a tech-minded guy, so some of it went over my head, but could smack you right in yours.  He delivers lots of sane advice for writers in general, and plenty of bad dragon jokes if you follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

If you want examples of how to mix the two types of self promotion together, then follow successful authors on social media.  Some of my favorites are Sam Sykes, Chuck Wendig, and Kent Wayne on Twitter or Facebook.  They are funny and promotional without being annoying about it.

Sorry that this is all I have on this topic, for now.  I’ll pass along any thing else I find in the future.  If you have a good resource for self-marketing and would like to share with the rest of us, feel free to drop a suggestion or link in the comments.

If you found this blog of interest, there is more in my over-ambitious Low-Budget Writing Program:

  1. Butt in Chair
  2. The Monster in My Manuscript
  3. Take over the Literary World!
  4. When the Manuscript Goes Into the Garbage
  5. Fear is the Mind-Killer
  6. Grammar and Punctuation and Bears! Oh, My!
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Low-Budget Writing Program: Part 6 Grammar and Punctuation and Bears! Oh, My!

I am the last person who should be giving anybody grammar and punctuation advice, but I will tell you about the books that have made my self re-education slightly easier.  You could, of course, go right to one of the style books, but there are over a dozen, and many more blogs, columns, and other sources.  I was looking for something that would entertain me into better usage.

Of course, when it comes to usage, there is the question of whether you side with the followers of linguistic prescription (the rules are always correct) or linguistic description (actual usage is more correct).  There is no right answer, by the way.  Just MANY different opinions, and most people fall somewhere in the middle.

‘When the student is ready the teacher will appear. When the student is truly ready… The teacher will disappear”

-Lao Tzu

This is a motto of mine.  All of these books were found in used book stores, gifting me with their timely appearance when I was on a strict budget.  Since I have been avoiding writing this post successfully–for a year–you are getting the added bonus of which book actually stuck around in my unreliable memory the longest.  Lucky, lucky you.

Scan_20171127 (36)Angels sang and the sky lit up with glorious rainbows when the prophesies came to pass, and I finally came across “The Elements of Style” by William Strunk Jr. and E. B. White (Forth edition by Allen & Bacon, Massachusetts 2000).  It was a shockingly thin book. (Six different publication dates, 1935 the earliest.  That is some serious staying power.)  I’m not sure why it took me so long to find a copy, since every time I’ve gone to the book store since that day there have been at least five copies to choose from.  I guess I was not ready before that day.

The word ‘style’ in the book’s title is not an accident, and that style is concise. If a writer wishes to be clear and bold with the English language, then this is a benchmark to guide you. Even if your style is wordy and obscure, it will still make an excellent base for writing in general.  (I, personally, got a huge kick out of the older ‘misused’ words, but I’m a total word-nerd.)  White’s added chapter five, with its twenty-one approaches to style, is worth serious study.  I may not keep a copy of the book in my pocket, as is suggested, but it sits on a shelf, close to hand.

Scan_20171127 (30)“Mortal Syntax” by June Casagrande (Penguin Group, New York 2008) is next on the pile. Clever and funny, this book is actually a defensive rant about all the things the author was accused of being wrong about–repeatedly–while she ran a grammar column.  (This is actually her second book, and I’m keeping an eye out for the first.)  In these pages I learned there were several style guides, and they didn’t always agree with each other.  No wonder the arguments get so heated, for there is no One True Way.  I enjoyed her biting humor, but the funny stories stayed with me longer than the actual grammar advice, and that wasn’t for very long, either.  My search continued…

Scan_20171127 (34)“Words Fail Me” by Patricia T. O’Conner (Harcourt Brace & Company, New York 1999) is another good and clever book full of anecdotes, but the rules she tried to convey were quickly forgotten.  It’s a good writing style book to try on, like a rambling conversation with a knowledgeable writer while wearing comfy yoga pants and sipping tea, and worth it if your brain remembers rules better in this way, but of limited use to me in the long run.

Who is the clear winner, and the book I will read again to brush up on rules before self-editing?

Scan_20171127 (32)“My Grammar and I… Or Should That Be Me?” Caroline Taggart and J. A. Wines (The Reader’s Digest Association, Pleasantville, NY 2009) is the closest to a school textbook, and it shocked me that that was what I actually needed.  I guess logic-brain wins this round, when I was putting my money on creative-brain all along.  Now, don’t be fooled thinking this is just dry rules.  The authors sprinkle in just enough Sahara wit to keep you from nodding off at your desk, then drooling until the bell rings and startles you awake.  Most importantly, I came away with a working knowledge of grammar and punctuation, which was the whole point of this project.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s been a year since I read this, and while I may have retained enough to get by, I definitely need to read this, again.  Soon.  An added bonus will be when I self-edit, I will know what to call the things that went wrong.  (Other than “Bastard,” that is.)  “Compound conjunction” and “irregular verb” will mean something, and not be just static in a confused brain.  I’m getting giddy just thinking about it!

Well, that’s the best advice I can give to date on this topic.  There’s nothing to fear about grammar and punctuation, and I’ve run out of time for the bears (maybe next time).  Don’t go off thinking you can go straight to self-publishing after this.  This should be just enough to not get you laughed out of the publisher’s office, or make a complete fool out of yourself online.  Self-publishing is going to require more eyes than just yours!  Either find some highly skilled (but free labor) beta readers, or your going to have to come up with the money for a good editor. Don’t trust yourself to catch every thing!  Even professional editors go to another editor.

While hanging out with other writers online, I found a grammar/editor blogger named Thomas Weaver who is fun, interesting, and does a daily Writing Glitch series that is great for testing your knowledge.  Follow him if you like a challenge, or if you might need something professionally edited in the future.  https://northofandover.wordpress.com/2017/11/27/writing-glitch-547/#like-10679

You may have missed the other posts of the Low-Budget Writing Program:

  1. Butt in Chair
  2. Monster in My Manuscript
  3. Take Over the Literary World!
  4. When the Manuscript Goes Into the Garbage
  5. Fear is the Mind-Killer
  6. Grammar and Punctuation and Bears! Oh, My!

Low-Budget Writing Program: Part 5 Fear is the Mind-Killer

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Anywriter who spends any time thinking about showing their work to another person has likely felt fear.  Unfortunately, that never goes away, according to the professionals who share tips.

I have already given my thoughts and book suggestions for getting the story written, but, obviously, there is more to learn.  There is a deep connection between the fear of writing and good writing.  Honestly, there should be a copy of “The Courage to Write” by Ralph Keyes (Henry Holt and Company, New York 1995) in the starter pack of every writer.  You didn’t get the starter pack?  Neither did I, but I did find the book at my local library.  (And just in time.)

The book is at first a warm hand holding yours, telling you all is well, your fears are perfectly normal, and–more importantly–useful, then there are a ton of examples of writers finagling their way around their fears to produce words of worth.  (And writers are pretty creative when it comes to finding a comfortable way to write.  Prepare to be shocked and amazed!)  If you find you are lacking the courage to put your work out there, please seek out this book before giving up on yourself.

“Trying to deny, avoid, numb, or eradicate the fear of writing is neither possible nor desirable.  Anxiety is not only an inevitable part of the writing process but a necessary part.  If you’re not scared, you’re not writing.  No message in this book is more important.  A state of anxiety is the writer’s natural habitat.”

Ralph Keyes

While we are on the subject of fear, there is a book that is incredibly useful in detailing the physical manifestations of fear, and when and why you should listen to your body/brain warnings.  “The Gift of Fear” by Gavin de Becker (Originally published by Little, Brown and Company in 1997, now updated and published by the author through Amazon 2010.) is also useful in lots of other ways to writers and other persons just trying to navigate the world in unsafe times, and nearly as important as a reminder for trusting your intuition.  (Intuition is sister to Inspiration.  Ignore either of them at your peril, for sisters do gossip.)

“‘No’ is a word that must never be negotiated, because the person who choses to not hear it is trying to control you.”

Gavin de Becker

 

Here are the other posts in this series:

  1. Butt in Chair
  2. The Monster in My Manuscript
  3. Take over the Literary World!
  4. When the Manuscript Goes Into the Garbage
  5. Fear is the Mind-Killer
  6. Grammar and Punctuation and Bears! Oh, My!

Why I Won’t Give A One Star Review

It’s a review, not a critique.

In fact, I don’t give less than a three star review.  Call me crazy if you wish, but a real person is behind that book.  Someone who (hopefully) tried their best.  I am not going to gleefully rip apart their work, just a faceless troll who lives for pain.

I have limited time, and it’s not my job to beta read and critique a published work.  If I liked a book at all, despite any problems, I’ll give it a favorable review and maybe point out something that threw me out of the reading groove.  The rule of thumb I was given while judging works of art was two positive comments for every negative, and it has never steered me wrong.

If it was too deeply flawed, I’ll skip the review.  My silence is my opinion.  My upbringing deeply instilled an ethic of, “If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything, at all.”

The book review is not the place for a deep critique.  Unless the author knows and trusts my opinion, it’s just a jumble of hateful words.  I won’t be that person.  I know how to give constructive criticism, and the review is too late.

If you chastise me for unbalancing a system that tries to rate books according to their merit, to you I say, “So What?”  At what point, in this screwed up system, does true fair play come into effect?  Shall I point out the people who admit to not finishing the book?  How is that fair?  Shall I point to the recent trend of ‘catfishing’?  How is that fair?  The person hurt in those situations is the author; dammed if they fight back, dammed if they don’t.

That being said, If I haven’t reviewed YOUR book (there are a few of you, and you know who you are), I’m not being silent and judgey.  I’m being overwhelmed with learning to blog, tweet, beta read, self-edit, navigate Word, my homemade writing course, make a website, figure out formatting, and one… other… thing.

Oh, yeah.  WRITE.  Apply butt to chair, tear thoughts out of my head, organize into words, lather, rinse, & repeat.

Wait.  Is that right?

Anyway, I’ll get you that review, ASAP.  I promise.  🙂